You’ll get a small window inside the game with instructions for what you need to do next, every step of the way to 120. You’ll also get a waypoint arrow that points you in the right direction to go at all times. If this sounds extremely convenient, you’re right! Zygor’s leveling guide/addon has completely taken the frustration out of leveling for me, personally. No more reading comments on WoWHead about how to complete quests. No more getting stuck, frustrated and bored with leveling. And no more feeling like WoW takes too much effort.
One thing they told me when I dabbled into computer science back at university was that 80% of the bugs only take 20% of your time to fix. That's why sometimes you see issues persisting for very long times, not because the devs are lazy or incompetent, but because there is usually a priority list of problems, with the severe-but-easy-to-fix ones always taking precedent and the not-game-breaking-but-difficult-to-solve problems being last line.
Thanks for stopping by! I'm Crzypck, officer, Raid Leader, and tank of Mist on Area 52, and the official raid guide writer partnered with Limit, the US#1 and World #2 guild. This is the home page for Limit's Official Battle of Dazar'alor Mythic Raid Guide. Every strategy guide has been thoroughly discussed, reviewed, and approved by officers from Limit.
Blizzard said it will choose players who have active subscriptions to the regular game based on a variety of factors to help them test the beta. It could be based on your PC, your commitment to the game, or just your luck. If you get in, you’ll likely receive an email, but if not, you can check your launcher. And remember: as with any beta, your progress will not be saved for when the game launches later this year.
You can opt in for the beta at the official site. When the beta launches on May 15, players who’ve gotten in will be able to play all the way from from level one to 30. WoW game director Ion Hazzikostas tells us that the beta will be “uncharacteristically small compared to our expansions,” in part to ensure that the focus is on the proper launch this August.
For example, the Azure Whelpling belongs to the Dragonkin family. However, it has Beast, Magic, and Elemental abilities in addition to a Dragonkin attack. Different attacks are strong and weak against different family types. Having a diverse spell selection might increase your chances of being prepared with a strong attack against an opposing team.
Analogy: think back on riding the swings in kindergarten. Was it fun? Now, imagine going back to those swings exactly as they were, and sitting in them now, as an adult. They're too small. They don't fit. Your feet drag on the ground because they're so low to the ground. The bar over your head is low enough that you can reach out and touch it, and even at the highest the swing will go, it's only about chest high when you're standing up. It's exactly the same swing, but riding on it now is a very different experience, yes?
While the avenues for a blood elf to become a demon hunter are limited, that does not mean that the story for this character is limited, regardless of following a particular path. What did your character do prior to the destruction of Quel’thalas? What drove your character to believing in Illidan’s cause so much more than Kael’thas’ own during his defection? What did your character accomplish during their time serving under Illidan and Kael’thas throughout northern Lordaeron, Outland, and Northrend? What does your character think of their people in the wake of Kael’thas’ death?
3. Your DH wants to make sure they're in on any information about the Legion that anyone else may have, and this would include the occasional visit to cities, where information flows densely and freely, and it's easier than trying to weasel your way into military meetings with military units that might not really trust your fel-infused butt. But if Mr General is having an ale at the bar, you can probably get him to blab at least something he might know that hasn't been shared yet, especially if you've provoked him into ranting at you just with your mere presence.
However, after a while the novelty of it wears off and you do start getting a little bored of all the eating and drinking (and wondering why your character isn't getting to Kul Tiran levels of fat), especially if you hop on to BfA for a bit in between. The difference is huge and once you're used to just slamming into 5 mobs and downing them quickly it can get a bit boring to just pull 1 mob at a time and then wait and wait. The really low levels aren't that different between live and Classic in terms of gameplay however, as the small amount of abilities means combat isn't exactly the most exciting thing in either. On live you get past that pretty quickly, but it takes a while longer in Classic (especially if you're playing solo).
Analogy: think back on riding the swings in kindergarten. Was it fun? Now, imagine going back to those swings exactly as they were, and sitting in them now, as an adult. They're too small. They don't fit. Your feet drag on the ground because they're so low to the ground. The bar over your head is low enough that you can reach out and touch it, and even at the highest the swing will go, it's only about chest high when you're standing up. It's exactly the same swing, but riding on it now is a very different experience, yes? 

It was the experience of the game that brought pleasure and joy, and that's what a lot of us want again. Not the numbers. When I play Classic I want to go through the deadmines with people I like and overcome a challenge together and see myself become stronger as a result. I don't want to play Classic so I can say "booyah! That number is exactly the same as it was 13 years ago!"
The main topic for Classic at the moment would be whether the game is actually harder or just has more redundant activities you have to do before doing the stuff that's really fun. This is actually a good discussion to have, and not just for WoW, but gaming in general. The main sticking point for now, as most people are on (relatively) low levels is the breaks between killing mobs, especially for mana users. In the beginning it's actually refreshing having to think about what you can and can't pull, not just running into a bunch of mobs and killing them in *insert current optimal time to kill Blizzard determined is the most fun*. The food/drink breaks after a few (or even one) mobs provide time to actually look around the scenery and the mobs you're facing, and while there isn't much strategy involved at these levels, you still at least pretend to plan out how you're going to get to that quest mob without being killed by the 4 random ones surrounding them. Not being able to pull whatever mob you want, and actually having to check what mobs are there when you don't have interrupts yet (casters tend to be a nightmare) is definitely more difficult in a real way than what we have today. As a caster, having to actually think about which spells to use based on mana cost (and perhaps even using lower ranked ones) is definitely more difficult and requires more engagement with your character than we have in modern WoW.
To get back to Classic for a bit, this is what I think is happening. Players who prefer the old ways (and full disclosure, I'd count myself among them, but to a smaller degree than most) complain/talk about the negative sides of modern WoW and Battle for Azeroth in general. While they do this they also talk about how things were better before and often mention Vanilla as a reference point. People who enjoy BfA now feel attacked by this and so they retaliate. Hence, liking Classic means you either have nostalgia goggles on or have no idea what you're talking about and will hate the same things you say you want 2 weeks after you start playing it. It's an amazing thing, where literally each side is doing to the other what they feel is being (wrongly) done to them. I feel like writing this is the most redundant thing I've ever done, and yet I also feel that it needs to be said, because it seems some people just don't get what they're doing, or at least I hope they don't (some do and are doing it on purpose but there's trolls everywhere so there's no point in even discussing them).
One thing they told me when I dabbled into computer science back at university was that 80% of the bugs only take 20% of your time to fix. That's why sometimes you see issues persisting for very long times, not because the devs are lazy or incompetent, but because there is usually a priority list of problems, with the severe-but-easy-to-fix ones always taking precedent and the not-game-breaking-but-difficult-to-solve problems being last line.
When it comes time that the body and mind have been prepared for the ultimate task, the potential demon hunter enters into a summoning circle surrounded by a binding rune. In the middle of this summoning circle, a single demon is called forward and the potential demon hunter is forced to fight for their lives without any help from the outside. The demon in question that is summoned is not influenced by the summoner, but the potential demon hunter within the circle might influence the demon that is summoned by a particular hatred or wish for vengeance upon a certain type of demon. If the potential demon hunter is successful in killing the summoned demon, they must then devour the heart of the creature as well as drink its blood. The binding of the demon’s soul to the demon hunter is extremely powerful, one in five surviving the ritual. As well, the demon’s flesh is extremely difficult to keep down, as if it tries to sear the inside of the body and crawl its way back up the throat of the potential demon hunter. After devouring the heart of the demon slain, each demon hunter is given a vision of the Burning Legion, witnessing the horrors of their enemy for themselves, ending with all potential demon hunters gouge out their own eyes. In the wake of the ritual, almost all successful demon hunters pass out either due to sickness, shock, exhaustion, or overwhelming fatigue.
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