The main topic for Classic at the moment would be whether the game is actually harder or just has more redundant activities you have to do before doing the stuff that's really fun. This is actually a good discussion to have, and not just for WoW, but gaming in general. The main sticking point for now, as most people are on (relatively) low levels is the breaks between killing mobs, especially for mana users. In the beginning it's actually refreshing having to think about what you can and can't pull, not just running into a bunch of mobs and killing them in *insert current optimal time to kill Blizzard determined is the most fun*. The food/drink breaks after a few (or even one) mobs provide time to actually look around the scenery and the mobs you're facing, and while there isn't much strategy involved at these levels, you still at least pretend to plan out how you're going to get to that quest mob without being killed by the 4 random ones surrounding them. Not being able to pull whatever mob you want, and actually having to check what mobs are there when you don't have interrupts yet (casters tend to be a nightmare) is definitely more difficult in a real way than what we have today. As a caster, having to actually think about which spells to use based on mana cost (and perhaps even using lower ranked ones) is definitely more difficult and requires more engagement with your character than we have in modern WoW.
Things like the Fishing training book from Booty Bay and the First Aid book from Stromgarde (A) and Brackenwall (H) will fetch a very good price, but even the less rare items like Undermine Clam Chowder recipe (from Steamwheedle Port, Tanaris) can sell well.  The Limited Supply routes in capital cities in Legion is still the same route and vendors as back in vanilla.  Become a Patreon to The Gold Queen and see the limited supply routes for IF, SW, Darn, Org, UC, and TB, as well as the Booty Bay special, in videos as part of the gold guide I’m still crafting.
One player said in a comment posted in response to the list, “Yeah people don’t realize the sheer enormity of game system evolution WoW has gone through since release. I’m not the biggest fan of BoA by any stretch, but I’ve played since closed beta vanilla, and I doubt I’ll be going back to classic. Leveling was painful. Experiencing these old systems once was enough.”

The fact that Cookie's Tenderizer from the Deadmines had +3 instead of +2 strength. The fact that the Stormwind south bank had one instead of two mailboxes. The fact that Jaina's Proudmore's name was "Jaina Proudmore" instead of "Jaina Proudless." Stuff like this isn't what mattered. It was arbitrary. If Cookie had dropped a shield instead of a mace and Jaina had been named Susan, nobody would have cared. It wasn't specific details like these that caused us to enjoy the game.
There is an Action Bar at bottom of the User interface. Each class starts with some skills. Every few levels, you will unlock new skills specific to your character class, these can be learned from your Class trainer. You will be introduced to one of these NPCs during one of the first few quests you complete in your starting zone, but they can also be found in many towns and each of your Faction's cities.
Good question. Me personally, when I use a new strat from somebody else, I always read thru the strat, and in the case I really need to level some pet, I then (likely) exclude strats that are mentioning things like “RNG”, “risk”, etc. But: I’m always happy (when using a new strat) when I see some detailed infos, so that I can estimate what is going to happen. But YMMV.
To me, certain character limits tend to be problematic not because of the length of actual content, but because of formatting tags and embedding taking up a lot of characters. This is something I experience on most of websites, not just this one, but the most aggravating issue over here is linking to user profiiles and other sources of strategies, which could be alleviated with internalisation of link paths and @mentions.
Similarly to Alliance’s Paladin, Shaman is a unique class option for Horde. Shaman boasts amazing group utility with its strong buffs through totems. Windfury totem is a must in any raid while Bloodlust in Classic is unique to the Shaman class. Restoration Shamans were considered the best group healers while other specs were also amazing in PvP environment capable of dishing out insane burst damage. Additionally, Shamans were able to wear mail armor, so any piece with spell power on mail set piece was almost certainly yours.
Allied Races Overview Everything about Allied Races, new playable races in World of Warcraft: Battle for Azeroth, including unlock requirements for each race, Heritage Armor, customization options, and speculation when they are playable. Battle for Azeroth (110-120) Leveling Tips and Consumables How to level from 110 to 120 as quickly as possible in WoW Battle for Azeroth, including recommended zone order, best consumables, general leveling tips, and best addons. Azerite Armor Overview and FAQ Everything known about Azerite Armor and Azerite Traits in Battle for Azeroth including what Heart of Azeroth Level they unlock and how to respec them using an Azerite Reforger. The Battle for Lordaeron - Introductory Battle for Azeroth Quests This guide is an overview of the Battle for Lordaeron scenario, including a walkthrough from both Alliance and Horde points of view. Wowhead's Guide on How to Play World of Warcraft The basics of getting started in World of Warcraft as a brand-new player. Game installation, character creation, how to move, and complete your first quest.

This did not just simply come randomly, however. Players have been demanding and asking for World of Warcraft Classic for many years now. And Blizzard has likely learned from companies like Jagex that regained a huge portion of their player-base with the launch of Old School RuneScape, which prior to it had a 2006Scape private server. Similarly, World of Warcraft Classic/Vanilla has been around in the form of private servers for many years now and has been very popular. Even top players and streamers have been known to play on these private servers. The only issue is Blizzard were not the ones profiting from these ventures.


Some players choose to take a slightly alternative approach to their gold farming. This approach can take an extensive amount of time and dedication. Many people choose to train a ton of alts, solely for the purpose of making money and multi-tasking. In World of Warcraft Classic, professions are usually paired together. For example, if you’re training alchemy, you will need herbs to create consumables (e.g. flasks) that are used for raiding. An intelligent and observant player could seize this knowledge by creating one alchemy alt and one herbalism alt, swapping items as needed between each other. This fully mitigates the fees by the Auction House, which means your profit is maximised. Another complimentary combination you can use is skinning and tailoring, or cooking and fishing.
To actually get access to the beta, which has already started and continue to add more players, you need to sign up via your Blizzard account management page. Under Games & Subscriptions, scroll down to Beta Access and visit the Beta Profile Settings page. Once there, you’ll see a grid of available betas you can opt into. Once you’ve checked WoW Classic, hit Update Preferences and you’re set.
With the Classic beta now out it seems every related article somehow manages to spark the eternal war of "Vanilla was the best WoW sucks now" and "lol nostalgia goggles, Vanilla sucked, enjoy your two weeks of Classic". I have to say, even though I understand the principles behind the battle and the reasons people behave and talk this way... I actually REALLY don't get it on a deeper level.

Since WoW Classic server has been announced at Blizzcon 2017, there is not much info about the server revealed. It is known that the upcoming expansion Battle for Azeroth pre-order has been available at blizzard shop, and the system requirements of Mac and Windows has been unveiled Recently, Forbes has an interview with J. Allen Brack and Jeremy Feasel about the project and some of the vision that developers have.
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