This is something that people really need to start to understand, not just for Classic or WoW but software developement in general. Fixing a bug isn't just flipping a switch or changing a single digit. You have a machine with literally hundreds of thousands of parts, designed by dozens of different people at different times over the course of 20 and more years. You change a single thing and it might break 50 other things in very subtle ways that might not even emerge until months later (i.e. the very high M+ keys some players got at the start of BfA).
You're absolutely right! I've changed the opening—I hope it gives you and your list the credit you deserve. As for those other tools, I didn't include them originally because I didn't consider them to be class specific. I'll include the Base Stats Calculator here, plus add a message at the top directing people to your list if they want a more comprehensive index!
For example, the Azure Whelpling belongs to the Dragonkin family. However, it has Beast, Magic, and Elemental abilities in addition to a Dragonkin attack. Different attacks are strong and weak against different family types. Having a diverse spell selection might increase your chances of being prepared with a strong attack against an opposing team.

Earlier this week, Blizzard finally announced a release date for World of Warcraft Classic, a barebones re-release of World of Warcraft long before it was filled with countless expansions. WoW Classic promises a pure, vanilla experience, one that a portion of the World of Warcraft playerbase has been chasing through unsanctioned vanilla servers stripped of various expansions. The game releases on August 27, which, while still a few months away, is still somewhat exciting, seeing as now most fans have an actual date to look forward to.
Unsurprisingly, the Tauren of Highmountain have chosen to join their cousins in the Horde. In order to unlock the Highmountain Tauren, you need to complete the main Highmountain storyline, which, if you’ve leveled through Legion, is probably already finished. You’ll also need to earn Exalted with the Highmountain Tauren. The majority of this reputation will come from completing the main storyline, and the rest can be earned from doing world quests in Highmountain.

I wanted to talk more about Classic here and my experience with it, especially relating to my Vanilla days, but somehow I kept writing about this rift that's forming in the WoW community. I can't seem to shake it, and for all the many, MANY times WoW was diagnosed as "dying" (and never did/never will), this one actually worries me. Some people have worried that Classic servers will split the community because BfA and Classic can't play together and few people will have the time to play both, but I'm worried it will REALLY split the community on a more philosophical level. At the moment WoW is back to being the most watched game on Twitch, beating out Fortnite and the rest, so shouldn't this be a happy moment for all of us that care about the game? Regardless of whether you enjoy BfA, or are holding on for the next expansion to fix things, or can't wait for Classic, can we at least TRY to keep things civil? We can disagree all day long, and I'm the first to put my opinions out there, but just don't accuse people of being... whatever it is you think they are. Argue facts, discuss calmly (or well, at least try to), and if you see the other person isn't doing the same, just politely stop talking to them. It's that simple.


Kaivax, a WoW forum community manager, revealed that WoW Classic's class design, battleground mechanics and stats on existing items will be set to their 1.12 state, despite the game releasing content that expands beyond that. This removes "progressive itemization," so if the stats on a specific piece of equipment was changed during the original updates, that won't take effect in this version.
World of Warcraft (also known as WoW) players have highly requested the classic version of their favourite game. As with any game, changes and major updates are added over the years. Since August 2006, many changes to the game have not been received well: such as trivialising levelling up. The level cap will drop from 120 to 60, but contrary to how that sounds, it will be a far more grindy journey of fun and progress. The current developers have made levelling up very fast in comparison to the classic days, purely to focus on end-game content and raiding which many people do not enjoy. Prior to these changes, many people enjoyed the games for years whilst not hitting max level, something never seen in the modern edition of World of Warcraft. The levelling process was a journey, having fun with professions and the grind that is no longer found. Of course, there are countless other changes that will be reverted, as you might expect when comparing something from 2006 to 2019.
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